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was shot and killed in his kandahar home today. a killer a bodyguard who taliban officials say they hired to infiltrate karzai's inner circle. this comes as a blow to the government just days after a visit from u.s. defense secretary leon panetta. we're joined by william cohen. thank you for being with us. >> good to be with you. >> let me ask you about this assassination. some have said this will be a huge propaganda victory for the taliban. do youee? >> anytime they can get that close to the inner circle of president karzai it's a big victory for them. it points out the difficulty that president karzai has had in trying to cope with the local politics as such where all frequently invoking tip o'neill's axiom that all politics is local. we're seeing that all politics are local in afghanistan. that's one of the problems that president karzai has. secondly his brother has a reputation of being a power broker. most of our military leaders have said there's not a military solution in afghanistan it's a political one. it makes it that much more difficult. i think it's going to be more challen
with a friend with a k-47. he was a key power broker in the fight with the taliban. we're live from kabul. it's tuesday, july 12th. let's get right to the first reads of the morning. we start with the deadlock. this afternoon the two sides are farther apart than they've ever been. they were farther apart yesterday when -- then they were even sunday and farther apart sunday then they were thursday. the question is whether the daily meetings are going to continue. the president said he's shooting for the biggest possible deal and asking if not now, when. listen. >> we think it's hard now. imagine how these guys are going to be thinking six months from now in the middle of election season when they are all up. it's not going to get easier, it's going to get harder. we might as well do it now. pull off the band-aid. eat our peas. >> also in the room, eric cantor laid out what was agreed to in the biden talks, which is about $1.5 trillion in cuts, still nearly a trillion dollars short of the amount required to finance a debt deal through 2012. republicans said it needs to be dollar for dollar. the
made in the last year and reclaiminghe former taliban ronghold particularly in the south. another major change in the last year is the surge in afghan security forces. there are now 100,000 more afghan security forces than 18 months ago when president obama announced the surge and another 70,000 afghan soldiers and police will be trained and equipped by the end of next summer when all 33,000 u.s. search trips will have withdrwn. in the testimony to congress last week, the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff admiral mollen characterized the president's decision as, quote, more aggressive and incurring more risk than mcraven had initially recommended. however, admiral mullen felt, could come only the president and the end can really determine the acceptable level of risk we must take because as he put it, quote, the truth is we would have run other kind of risks by keeping more forces in afghanistan onger. and among the other risks for the risks of perpetuating the greater afgh dependent on the forces and inhibiting the growth and keep the devotee and confidence on the part of the afgha
action against the taliban as well as al qaeda. meanwhile, secretary panetta told reporters on the plane it's time to focus on defeating al qaeda once and for all. >> i think we had undermined their ablthd to conduct 9/11-type attacks. we had them on the run. >> secretary panetta met with american military officials. atia abawi is in afghanistan. good morning. bring us up to date. >> good morning. panetta's very first trip as secretary of defense to afghanistan, before he landed he brought up the situation with al qaeda. he said, quote, the strategic defeat of al qaeda is within reach. this is a time to go after him, especially after bin laden. let's listen to what he had to say. >> now is the moment following what happened with bin laden, to put maximum pressure on them because i do believe that, if we continue this effort, that we can really cripple al qaeda. >> panetta said that, in fact, in that information they found from bin laden's compound it points to 10 to 20 key leaders of al qaeda in different places such as pakistan, yemen, somalia and different parts of africa. but coming b
's speculation of everybody from the cia to drug lords to the taliban. >> absolutely. that speculation is still runs. it's not clear whether his absence will have that big of a stabilizing effect. from the united states point of view karzai's brother caused a lot of problems, he was always playing a double game, but he managed a lot of relationships. he had the charisma to maintain that network. for karzai. that was crucial. you can see how karzai really needed a counterbalance to the taliban when it came to now we have to see who can fill that void try to manage those relationship nots to mention the lucrative narcotics routes to try to maintain the piece while u.s. forces are there. more importantly, though, the real focus we have is the u.s./pakistani negotiation and whether pakistan can come through in developing some sort of accommodate with the taliban that would allow the u.s. to disengage. >> dave, go ahead. >> what is the impact of the united states drawing down in afghanistan? i'm talking about police actions and espionage, which we can pursue anyway. what is the impact of us drawing
of aid to pakistan's army. the u.s. wants more aggressive actions taken against the taliban and isn't happy about the country's decision to revoke visas for american military trainers, this according to reports at the new york times. mr. daley stopped by abc this week to talk about the tricky relationship. >> obviously they have been an important ally in the fight in terrorism. they've been the victim of enormous amounts of terrorism, but right now they have taken some steps that have given us reason to pause on some of the aid which we were giving to their military and we're trying to work through that. >> tensions between the two countries have been on the rise since u.s. navy seals killed osama bin laden bin during a raid on -- osama bin laden during a raid on pakistani soil in may. >>> defense secretary leon panetta says he believes allied forces can beat back al-qaeda and the taliban. fox's david piper reports from a visit of american troops in afghanistan this weekend. >> reporter: before leaving to iraq america's defense secretary headed to afghanistan to see for himself the
a pretty scathing piece for politico in which you compared the tea party to the taliban. is that going a bit far? >> i was trying to point out that they're inflexible. the taliban, as you know, blew up centuries old statues of buddha because they wanted to be religiously pure, just as the tea party has threatened to bring down the government economically by not agreeing to raising the debt ceiling unless they get 100% of what they want. that's not realistic. no one gets 100% in this world except maybe some extremists like the taliban. we don't do 100% in this country and no one -- they should stop holding out for everything that they originally wanted and agree and declare victory. they've won quite a bit. >> rick: david, as you surveyed the gop landscape heading into 2012, how has the tea party changed the picture for republicans and is it for the better? >> it's for the better from a point that we are finally talking about fiscal responsibility again in this country. we're finally talking about doing the things to get the economy going in the right direction, which under barak obama
making against the taliban as well as al qaeda. as well as $800 million in assistance could be suspended. this could cause some major problems. if pakistan takes tougher action, the aid could resume. mean while, defense secretary leon panetta is in afghanistan. panetta is meeting with american military leaders and afghan officials. nbc's atia abawi is in kabul this morning. bring us up to speed on what leon panetta is saying that al qaeda is basically on the run and close to being completely stamped out. >> reporter: good morning, thomas. the new secretary of defense's first trip as the defense secretary here in afghanistan, prior to arriving he talked to reporters on the plane about how he feels alg al qaeda is going right now, the war against terror. he says the strategic defeat of al qaeda is within reach, primarily pointing the the death of bin laden, the information they got from the compound including names of different key al qaeda leaders. he says this is the time to actually end the war with al qaeda. let's listen to what he had to say. >> now is the moment following what happen
. the -- the whole issue is on that border. the border with afghanistan, waziristan, taliban, al qaeda, other troops are operating. >> pakistan will continue the fight, even without the $800 million in military aid, it will continue the fight against the militants. a lot of people are saying, where have you been until now? what fight is taking place at this point? >> it's true. it's a fair criticism. it's a fair criticism that the pakistanis haven't done enough in certain areas. you have to balance that by saying it's a very tough fight for them as well. they've lost 30,000 troops fighting terror in their country. they've had numerous terror attacks. they're doing hard. it's not like it's sitting on their hands. there long has been, the continues to be things as that security services are helping some groups that are anti-u.s. the anti-u.s. sentiment in the company are not diminishing, but growing. >> i have to talk about the royals. >> it's your thing. >> prince william in california playing polo? i love this. >> he did well, he scored goals as well. i wonder if the defense was a little bit loose t
and promised to tackle inequality and corruption. >>> taliban militants have carried out a major attack in southern afghanistan using multiple suicide bombers, rocket-propelled grenades, and machine guns. more than 20 people were killed, including a bbc reporter. it targeted the offices of the deputy governor, the police headquarters, and a private security firm. >>> you are watching "newsday." still to come, the u.s. and north korea hold talks in new york. >> in the footsteps of john steinbeck, we find out what life is like for americans 20 -- seven years after the great book was published -- more than 70 years after the great book was published. >>> norwegian police have finished their search for bodies on the island. anders breivik has admitted to killing 68 people. prosecutors say he will be interrogated friday. we have this report from oslo. >> at the cathedral, the floral carpet continues to grow. this person knows that one of these attributes could easily been for him. he came face-to-face with the gun man and lift. >>-- and lived,. >> he started shooting around me and he got sev
by the taliban. this reflects assistmatic policy of the taliban and their isi handlers, the intelligence organization is i think behind this as well. and also al-qaeda. this policy is a tool to eliminate real and potential enemies of the islamists they want to reimplant back in cob he will. >> so this is a blow to the u.s. in afghanistan? >> yes, and also the destabilization. it's another example of pakistan interference in this area. the senior of military commander, a marine general, told the minnesota media last week that the pakistanis have still not severed the taliban supply lines coming in from pakistan. >> so many were aware of them and what they were up to when bin laden in was captured and they think wow, did they know about this, were they shielding them. now they are cutting off $800 million s that the right move? >> yes, it is certainly the right move. we should have done is before, ten years late. we should have conditioned the aid and especially the military aid long ago. we should also take other steps. >> like what? >> in 1993 secretary of state baker sent aler to the pa
here. >> that's my question. can pakistan's military take on the taliban and militancy without u.s. money and resources, reza? >> reporter: well, look. they have a big army. 600,000 soldiers. it's one of the biggest armies of the world. they are not the best trained army, not the most proficient when it comes to fighting and insurgency. fighting that the taliban, that they've needed the help of the u.s. in the past, but, again, they're saying they don't need the help anymore. they're going to continue to fight without the u.s.' help. but it doesn't square with previous statements made in the past. previous demands for the u.s. to give them more money, give them resources, claims that they need help. now they say they don't need help. i think this is gamesmanship and i think all of this really underscores a troubled relationship, but i think what's important to point out is though the relationship is hurting there is no indication that it will end. both countries realize that they need one another so i think there are indications that it will stagger forward despite the troubles.
at these countries, that they are not radicals connected to terrorists like al qaeda or the taliban, or the muslim brotherhood. in egypt, for instance, right now, and tunisia and other countries in the middle east, we do not know who is going to be in charge. we are talking about supporting various governments, when they have an election. until we see what happens in the elections, we should not be giving money to those who are sympathetic in working with terrorist organizations in do not have our interests at stake. or want to destroy the state of israel. so, right now, for instance, in egypt the barrier between egypt and gaza has been broken down, in effect. hamas, in control of gaza right now, can bring in more weapons to attack israel. a signal that really bothers me, because it indicates to the muslim but -- brotherhood that they have more influence than people realize. in the past they have asked for the destruction of israel. and host: the muslim brotherhood is not considered a terrorist group. guest: if you look at their history, they have been committed to changes in the middle east, incl
an eye on in the newsroom. the taliban claiming the responsibility for the assassination of hamid karzai's half brother. he was gunned down at his heavily guarded home in kandahar. russia opening up a criminal negligence investigation into the deadly sinking of a cruise ship. the boat was apparently overloaded at the time of the accident. 88 people now confirmed dead, another 41 still missing. hopes for finding them alive are fading today. and just days after a stun gun was found on a jetblue flight from boston to newark a lufthansa passenger is busted at jfk airport trying to board a plain with two stun guns stashed in his luggage. greg: brand-new developments in the gop race for the white house in 2012. tea party favorite michelle bachman seems to be making substantial gains. take a look at this. in a poll conducted by a republican pollster bachman is the frontrunner in iowa, the state that holds the first caucus leading mitt romney 25-21%. while mitt romney leads in new hampshire take a look at bachman, she is surging into second-place jumping 8 percentage points in one month alone. j
the next year. he says he hopes to drive the taliban into peace talks over that period. he also said he was upbeat about prospects of defeating al-qaeda if they can capture and kill remaining leaders. >> i would say somewhere around 10 to 20 key leaders, between pakistan, yemen, so somalia and north africa, if we can go after them, i think we really can strategically defeat al-qaeda. >> he also said the targeting of leaders such as the al-qaeda chief ayman al-zawahri continues to limit their ability to conduct attacks. he may just go well over the border in pakistan's northwest in tribal areas. he also admits there was some skepticism about what help they are getting from pakistan after they killed osama bin laden last month. he did say that in the past pakistan has helped them track down some of the al-qaeda leadership. >> heather: thank you very much, david piper streaming live from afghanistan. >> gregg: are we really in reach of defeating al-qaeda? is the road to victory as simply as taking out the top 20 leaders. joining me now is senior advisor and principal of international advis
works in areas outside his control. control of kandahar is key in the fight against the taliban. thousands of extra u.s. troops were brought in the area of the past year to try to pacify it. the u.s. state department doesn't believe those of hamid karzai's assassination will affect the draw down in troops. danger that remains may be a vacuum than murky one in the troubled city. in kabul, david piper, fox news. >> bret: this afternoon president obama awarded medal of honor to army ranger who protected fellow soldiers to a live grenade. the private first class petrie becomes the second living service member to receive medal of honor for heroism in afghanistan. he lost his right hand as the grenade exploded. >>> as we continue to follow the effect of fast and furious, we have update on monday's report that obama administration's plan for new gun restrictions on certain type of weapons. here is correspondent shannon bream. >> reporter: gun dealers in four southern border states reports that semi-automatic weapons to authorities. the department of justice and the white house -- [ ina
back the afghanistan taliban we are state sponsors of terrorists. good start. not enough. see what is next. hope that our government doesn't fold. i think the good sign is our government is finally, finally, in the face of overwhelming evidence, pakistanis were hiding bin laden, et cetera, they are wising up. admiral mullen, the outgoing chairman of the joint chiefs is measured in his speech last week accused the pakistani intelligence of killing one of the leading journalists. that tells me something is changing. it is about time. >> a lot of people are saying in support of this move, we are done trying to win the hearts and mines of pakistanis and by tightening the noose that could force them to be amenable to our needs than they have been. do you agree? >>guest: the pakistanis regard us as an enemy and they take us for all they can get. when we freeze the stuff they need such as body armour and night vision goggles but the demonstration in syria was run by the syrian government organized by the security forces and the syrians have upped the ante. i have to give a shout out to ou
killed karzai. the taliban says -- >> we've seen the worst so far. excessive heat warnings and advisories posted in 23 states. the heat in many areas could reach 115 degrees. the heat wave is being blamed for one death in madison county, illinois. in oklahoma it was so hot, that part of a highway buckled. look at that. motorist was hospitalized after his bike hit the buckled pavement. in arkansas several communities have opened cooling centers. good rule of thumb in tis heat whatever you're doing don't overdo it. >> if you're going to go outside in heat like this better be drinking a lot of water before you come out. make sure you have some substance in your stomach or you might be going to the hospital. >> it was hard to stay focused because it was so hot out. >> dehydrated, exhausted, just tired. >> right now nearly 400,000 people in the chicago area are still without power following the worst storm in a decade. utility officials say it could be several days before many of those customers are back on-line. the video we're looking at here, i think you saw an airplane there, i'm not sure,
associated allies, especially the taliban, of course. he also felt like there had been progress in developing and training the afghan national security forces, the army and the national police, especially in the past year-and-a-half. still a long way to go. he did not make any comments specifically yesterday about the killing of ahmad karzai. he let those comments to the white house. it expressed regret and condemn the assassination of president karzai's half-brothers. i think there is concern generally that there could be some instability, beahmad wali karzai in its prominent position in canada are what ikan -- kandahar, he was a key figure in keeping control there. that may have been more of a concern a year ago before the u.s. had managed to reclaim control of that area with its afghan allies and partners on the ground. so there may not be as much ramification now as there might have been a year ago. still there is likely to be jockeying for position and power among the local forces there. host: finally, the defense secretary did not cut a pakistan on this particular trip. did he talk abou
over this month and, panetta said he hoped to drive the taliban to peace talks during the period when u.s. force draw down and is key they keep the pressure up now so there is a chance of some kind of reconciliation in the country. back to you, jamie. >> jamie: thanks so much, david. >> eric: so is secretary panetta's assessment of al qaeda on target or is the install installed pentagon chief possibly speaking too early? for more, let's bring in fox news contributor and former ambassador totty nations, john bolton, who joins us this morning from jerusalem. good morning, ambassador. >> good morning, glad to be here. >> eric: panetta's prediction sounds awfully optimistic. you hope he's right. we got bin laden. does that mean in your view we can actually finish off al qaeda, once and for all? >> well, you know, this is almost 180° switch for the administration. president obama had told us for some time that those old-fashioned concepts of victory and defeat were really outmoded and we need to think about success, rather than victory. now, we have secretary panetta, saying that merely by
the taliban to peace talk in the period when the u.s. forces draw down. it is key to keep pressure up now to give the country a chance of some reconciliation. speaking in capped har, the new defense chief said the focus of the trip is the handover of security to afghan forces. he acknowledged that the remain, "a lot more work to do in terms of being able to transition the responsibility to them." now that leon panetta has moved to iraq, his focus will be on the situation there and concerns as he said here about iranian weapons smuggling. after all, 15 u.s. troops were killed there last month. back to you. >> shannon: all right, david. thank you very much. crews in india are scrambling through wreckage at this hour, desperately searching for survivors of a deadly train crash. more than 100 people were hurt and at least 31 killed when this express train derailed near the city of luknow. the death toll has been rising all morning long. the train was heading to new delhi from calcutta when officials say 12 cars skidded off the tracks. ♪ ♪ >> shannon: much of the debate over reigning in th
. taliban, elements in pakistan use governmental power to support terrorism by muslims. left wing press wants to compare nuts like breivik and mcvey to state sponsored terrorism and worldwide jihad. again, dishonest and insane. the second reason the ricial media is pushing the christian angle is they don't like christians very much because we are too judgmental. many christians oppose abortion. gay marriage, and legalized narcotics. secular left causes. the media understands the often based on religion. they want to diminish christianity and highlighting so-called christian-based terror is a way to do that. the primary threat to this world comes from islamic terrorism. iran is a major problem. if the country gets nuclear weapons and it's desperately frying to. does anyone doubt those weapons would be used. a muslim in pakistan exported nuclear technology to north korea. and muslim suicide bombers below innocent people up almost every day. yet, once again the liberal media wants you to fear christian terrorists going forward when jihad is mentioned, you know breivik and mcvey will enter
the taliban to peace talks during that period so there can be a reconciliation in this country. the defense secretary was also upbeat about prospects of defeating al-qaeda. the key, he says, is to capture or kill the remaining leaders. >> somewhere around 10 to 20 key leaders that between pakistan, yemen, somalia, aqim and north africa, those are -- if we can go after them, i think we really can strategically defeat al-qaeda. >> he also said the targeting of leaders such as the new al-qaeda chief continues to limit their ability to conduct attacks. he said he believes the al-qaeda leader may well be just over the border in pakistan's northwestern tribal areas. and general petraeus, who leaves his post here this month to head the c.i.a., also said today, al-qaeda was on the run, in his opinion. enormous damage is being done to the al-qaeda network over the border in pakistan. back to you. >> rick: david piper on the phone from kabul for us. thanks for the update. >> rick: getting the royal treatment, a polo club in california hosting a future king, prince william is taking part in a charity
of the last year, the taking away of important safe haivens inside afghanistan from the taliban. there's clearly tough work and fighting that lies ahead. i repeatedly said while the progress is significant, for example, it remains fragile and reversible. >>> general david patreaus spending his eighth fourth of july and his last as commander of allied forces in afghanistan visiting the troops in the southern part of that country yesterday. welcome back to morning joe, pat buchanan and gerald ford with us. best-selling author and wes moore, good to have you on the show this morning. patreaus will start the new job as director of the cia in september. he talks about the hard work ahead. the changes in the troops. any gut feeling about how that will transpire? >> one transition we'll see is as we're leaving the 10,000 and the 20,000, how that's going to change in terms of troop alignment and geoloe geography. we'll see a shift towards the east to the pakistan border. that's where i spent my time. we're starting to see a lot of the flow from fighters coming from pakistan. >> let me ask you,
happen in kandahar province, which is the real former stronghold of the taliban. he has a lot of enemies, both among the insurgency and also among the various criminal networks that work in that area. he himself has been accused of drug ties, criminal ties, and even of being on the payroll of the cia. all things that ahmad wali karzai denies. he has a very murky reputation. it's hard to know, even though the taliban claims responsibility, what happened and who is behind it. host: how does the u.s. view him? guest: the u.s. has most recently seen him as an unsolvable problem. he has been a friend to the u.s. for a long time. because he has been someone who has been hard to bring on board with some of the programs to develop the province, to work with the military -- no one says this directly, granted, because he is a relative of hamid karzai. in private talks, u.s. officials would say they do not know exactly how to handle him. at the same time, he was also someone who was exerting a certain amount of control over the area and able to pass by areas that may not have otherwise been passed
the taliban to peace talks when the u.s. forces drawdown. it's key to keep the pressure up to give the country a chance of some kind of reconciliation. and speaking in kandahar, he said the focus of the trip is the handover of security to afghan forces but he acknowledged there remain, quote, a lot more work to do in materials of being able to transition the responsibility to them. afghan forces now number around 300,000 but very few of their units can act independently. back to you, gregg. >> gregg: david piper, thank you. >> heather: space shuttle atlantis linking up with the international space station important the last time. the final dock go to the orbital out post by a shuttle. it will retire after the flight. the last of the 30-year shuttle program. on its final journey, they arrived bearing gifts, four tons of supplies including clothing and food. >> america's brush with royalty coming to a close, duke and duchess wrapping up a tour in southern california. one of their final stops skid row arts school for kids of all ages. casey stegall is live in los angeles with more. explain the pu
in afghanistan. >> reporter: he spent 2002 and 2003 near kandahar hunting for taliban. he came back in harvard, but in 2009 with the national guard unit he went back to afghanistan. >> i spent a lot of time with rock clearance units, looking for ieds, and my vehicle never got hit and i am very lucky, very lucky. when you go up and pull open the door and see your injured buddies, you never forget that sight. >> reporter: he began to explore the science of brain injury. when the brain gets hit by a blast wave, it slams up against the skull. >> reporter: he developed new tools to study how the blast hurts the brain. >> concussions that your favorite football player suffers, or the head injury you get in a car accident or shaken baby syndrome, those are all examples of head injuries that can cause a traumatic head injury. >> more than half a dozen students are veterans. >> we're focused on this, because these are our buddies, our guys, and this could have been us, and it might still be us. so it brings a certain level of urgency to what we're trying to do. >> reporter: dr. john sanjay gupta, cnn,
. the threat is not from the taliban, but apparently from their own government . >> he held me like this. >> it happened in seconds. >> where did they hit you. >> punches to the gut from four attacks. a few baton whacks and the kicks to the body. >> i was thinking about -- that i'm going to die today. >> the victim of the attack was the pakistani journalist. his attackers were not street thugs they had police uniforms on and pulled him over. >> they said if you want to be a hero, we will make you a hero. >> and an example. >> it's not clear who roughed him up, but he is feeting over a string of attacks against journalists that raised a troubling question. are the spy agents? they told the british paper, the guardian he was kidnapped and beaten after he wrote a report about illegal arrests by intelligence agencies, whoever beat him a second time didn't like that they made him look bad. >> the last time, they threatened to wrap my body. under these circumstances, what can i do? >> his beating came less than three weeks after the still unsolved murder of another pakistani journalist. for ye
community is now free from the terror of the taliban, and afghan forces that are taking more responsibility for their security. and he carries with him the memories of americans who have made the ultimate sacrifice to make this progress possible. earlier in the to value office, leroy gave me the extraordinary privilege of showing me the small plaque that is bolted to his prosthetic arm. on it are the names of the fallen rangers from the 75th regiment. they are quite literally part of him. just as they will always be part of america. one of those names is of the ranger who did not come back from the raid that day. specialist christopher gaitherkill. christopher's brother, sister and grandmother are here today. i would ask that they stand briefly so that we can show our gratitude for their family's profound sacrifice. [applause] [applause] >> our heros are all around us. they're the force behind the force. military spouses like ashley who during leroy's many deployments, during missed birthdays and holidays has kept this family, army strong. so we're grateful to you, ashley, and to all the mi
day. can this be reversed? can taliban reversed or does that only happen on repeal of the law? >> i think this can be reversed. i think this is a specific thing that should be reversed. we can get this out of the law, this is something that should be removed. we have enough bureaucrats. bill: the inner pulse, he wrote the book, dr. marc siegl, thank you, fox news medical a team. good to see you. >> you too. heather: another black eye for the tsa, ten days after a nigerian man takes a joy ride with an expired passport, can you believe this, a stun gun makes its way on to a flight from logan airport to newark. live with the details. bill: a thrilling last minute goal, if you did not see it, man, you missed out, women's world cup soccer, abby wombach, that was the winner, next stop, the finals on wednesday with france and the u.s. bill: so you wait all year for summer to come along and then there's this, a series of shark sightings keeping money folks -- many folks out of the water, at least three confirmed sightings along the shores of cape cod, massachusetts and the town of chatham.
is training eventual new members of the taliban. he further stated, trainers are doing a wonderful job but we don't have the time to make an army or police force in afghanistan. the general closed his email to me by saying this, every day someone dies. every day someone dies. it is time to bring our troopings home from -- troops home from afghanistan. how many more children have to cry in a mom or dad's grave site because their mother or daddy went to afghanistan to prop up a corrupt leader named karzai that we send $10 billion a month to? i hope no other children have to cry like edy and stephanie. that brings me to my close, mr. speaker. several weeks oak eugene robertson in his editorial titled "afghanistan strategy, let's go." we wanted to kill or capture osama bin laden, and we did. even so, say the hawks, we have to stay in afghanistan because of the dangerous instability across the border in nuclear armed pakistan. but does anyone believe the war in afghanistan has made pakistan more safe? no, it has not. in fact, it's more fragile now than it's ever been. the threat from afghanistan i
the countries is important. remember, america needs pakistan to help fight the taliban. to do that, pakistan needs america's money. bbc news, washington. >>> nearly two years after those american hikers were captured and taken to an iranian prison the only one to be released is pushing to bring her friend and fiance home. sarah shourd organized a rally in duluth, minnesota, for shane bauer and josh fattal, hoping to bring attention back to the men. the iranians accuse the hiker of being american spies. >>> the royal couple, they are back home today after a whirlwind hollywood weekend. and yes, even tinseltown seemed a little bit star-struck by wills and kate. bob woodruff was there for every single squeal. >> reporter: on this final day of their north american tour, a greeting fit for rock stars. >> oh my goodness! >> i shook his hand. it was so exciting. look, i'm shaking. >> they're shaking hands, they're talking to the children, they're accepting their flowers, they're just lovely. >> reporter: and then for the first time on the trip, the duchess responded to a reporter's question. >> how
was on the run for 16 years and the taliban reportedly training chinese muslim kids in terror camps now. the kids were shown how to plant roadside bombs. london's daily mail said they posted a recruitment video of the young terrorists in training. brian? >> stepping up security screening after new evidence shows that terrorists are using surgically implanted bombs to attack america and americans. some of these doctors of death have been educated here in the united states of america. joining us right now from phoenix is the president of the american-islamic forum for democracy. say it ain't so, doctor, this is true? >> well, i don't think we should be surprised. i mean, these positions, we've seen it with the bombers and we've seen it an mit scientist and an emergency doc that was healing al-qaida to go back. we've seen it from dictators like one in syria who was trained in london and went back to be one of the worst dictators in the middle east. >> i want to run through some of them who have been chronicled. this guy that you just mentioned went to columbia. >> yeah. remember, they are trained
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